Is it Time to Add a Garden on Your Home? - Interstate Roofing

Is it Time to Add a Garden on Your Home?

Is it Time to Add a Garden on Your Home?

Colorado is undoubtedly a unique place to live and we celebrate our diversity every chance we get. It doesn’t seem surprising that many of the people here have gotten into “Urban Homesteading”. This new trend, that people do for a variety of reasons, is all about growing food in an urban environment.

At Interstate Roofing we love seeing the diversity and creativity that comes out in your urban gardens and it’s just another reason that we love to serve this community. Check out this article if you are trying to get your own garden going this spring.

http://www.5280.com/backyardbountyUrban Homesteading in the Mile High City | 5280 When the first pioneers rolled into Colorado via covered wagon, they had no alternative to growing, raising, and hunting their own food. Today, it’s by choice that an increasing number of Denverites are planting veggies, raising chickens, and even milking goats in their backyards. You may be wondering, Why bother?

“People are coming at this from a gajillion different places,” says Dana Miller, co-chair of the Denver Sustainable Food Policy Council, a group of appointed volunteers that advises the mayor. Think: preppers who want to be self-sustaining in case of the zombie apocalypse; do-gooders on a mission to help solve food-access problems; DIY-happy hipsters into handcrafted everything; parents worried about pesticides; and foodies craving the freshest flavors.

No matter your motivation, you’re in luck if you live in the Mile High City, where, over the past half-decade, urban homesteading restrictions common in other towns have loosened considerably. Hens and goats have been legal residents in Denver since 2011; Colorado’s 2012 Cottage Foods Act allows home cooks to sell low-risk foods prepared in their own kitchens; and last July’s residential sales ordinance means gardeners in Denver can now set up stands to peddle their produce in their front yards. On a larger scale, nonprofits are establishing community gardens in food deserts across town and hosting regular classes on beekeeping, raising goats and chickens, and preserving fresh produce. 5280.com

 

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